The worst drought in recent years

DROUGHT IN SOMALIA

URGENT APPEAL

Somalia is experiencing one of the worst drought in recent years. More than 60 per cent (3.5 million) of the 5.9 million people in need of humanitarian assistance in Somalia, are experiencing acute food insecurity. Humanitarian workers project that the number of people in need of assistance and protection will rise to 7.7 million people in 2022 (OCHA 2021). The country is experiencing its third consecutive below-average rainfall season since late 2020, which is worsening the current drought conditions, particularly in the southern, central, and northeastern parts. These areas have received little to no rainfall since June due to delayed October to December 2021 deyr rains, according to FAO/SWALIM1.

According to the FAO latest drought update, the worst affected regions include Lower Juba, Middle Juba, Gedo, Mudug, Nuugal, Bari, Toghdheer and Sool which are currently experiencing severe water shortages for domestic, livestock and agricultural production purposes. In October, the Prime Minister appealed for increased humanitarian assistance to people in Jubaland, and a federal ministerial committee visited Kismayo response to assess the situation. On 27 October, an interagency assessment mission visited Dhobley town in Afmadow, which is one of the most affected districts in Jubaland and found that over 41,000 drought-affected people need urgent water, food and shelter assistance. More than half of the affected people have moved from their villages due to severe drought conditions to urban areas.

Food Crisis (IPC Phase 3) outcomes are expected to become widespread, and Emergency (IPC Phase 4) outcomes are expected to emerge in Juba Pastoral, Bay Bakool Low Potential Agropastoral, and Coastal Deeh Pastoral livelihood zones between November 2021 and March 2022. Humanitarian partners estimate that more than 250,000 people are facing severe water shortages, half of them in Jubaland State. If the deyr rains perform more poorly than forecast, then Emergency (IPC Phase 4) outcomes would be possible in additional areas, especially during January-March Jilaal dry season, according to the FAO/SNAU analysis.

According to our teams on the ground, United Nations and other international organizations, the immediate urgent needs are: Provision of Clean Water: water shortages and challenges of getting safe drinking water has contributed to cases of acute watery diarrhea (AWD) /cholera cases in some areas across the country (UNICEF, November 2021). According to Federal Ministry of Health and Human Services, a total of 88 suspected cases of cholera were reported in the last week of February from Bay, Afgoye, Marka and Banadir regions, with no reported deaths. Emergency Food Distribution: the country is in the grip of severe drought – malnutrition rates are rising rapidly. Providing emergency food aid and supporting large therapeutic feeding centres which provide the masses food and nutrition are top priorities.

Medical Assistance:  Disease and illness is spreading fast in Somalia. Watery diarrhea is already reported three regions affecting the live poor children and mothers. Establishing mobile clinics in affected areas particularly AWD/Cholera affected regions remains a top priority.

Provision of Shelter: according to the UN/OCHA 116, 000 people are internally displaced due to water shortages. These people do not have any kind of accommodation or sanitation. They live in under the trees. Provision of temporary shelter such us plastic sheets is top priorities.

 

We are responding to the humanitarian
needs of some of the most vulnerable IDPs. They urgently need essentials such
as food, hygiene and sanitation kits, water containers, emergency shelter
and short-term work opportunities.

African Development Trust (ADT is urgently appealing to anyone able to assist to respond quickly with aid and support of any kind before it is too late.

 With your support we will be able to reach even more people in desperate need.

Thank you 

Abdurazak Mohamed

ADT

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One in four Somalis facing acute hunger due to worsening drought-UN

Worsening drought affects 2.3 million people in Somalia 

 

The effect of drought

Drought can also affect people’s health and safety. Examples of drought impacts on society include anxiety or depression about economic losses, conflicts when there is not enough water, reduced incomes, fewer recreational activities, higher incidents of heat stroke, and even loss of human life. This has long-lasting socio-economic and environmental impacts and is considered the most damaging type of natural disaster. Droughts cause habitat loss, the migration of local species, and the spread of invasive alien species, leading to biodiversity loss. Droughts can reduce air quality and compromise the health of people with certain conditions, according to the CDC. These particles can irritate the airways and worsen chronic respiratory illnesses, such as asthma, the CDC says. The resulting low dam levels led to water restrictions being imposed on users across several countries in Southern Africa. Additional impacts of the drought are the death of livestock and poor crop yields due to poor or no rainfall making water unavailable for irrigation. However, Somalia’s “rapidly worsening” drought has left more than two million people facing severe food and water shortages, the United Nations has warned. The Horn of Africa is now “on the verge of a fourth consecutive failed rainfall season”, according to a joint statement by the Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA) and the Somali government released last month.
“Somalia’s “rapidly worsening” drought has left more than two million people facing severe food and water shortages.”
 

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